Exciting Adventures in the English Language and Culture

Month: April 2020

Efficient and effective: not to confuse

Efficient and effective share the first three letters but shouldn’t be confused as their meanings are very different.

Efficient means ‘working well, without wasting time, money or energy’.

My new car is more fuel efficient than the old one was and saves me about £50 every week.

Laura’s the most efficient PA (personal assistant) I’ve ever had: my business life is perfectly organised with every little thing running smoothly.

Effective, on the other hand, means ‘successful, having the right effect or solving the problem’.

These painkillers aren’t cheap but they’re extremely effective – your headache will be gone in seconds.

A string of pearls would look very effective with that dress.

Now you know!

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Colour Idioms: White

This is part 4 of the series of blog posts on colour idioms and today we turn our attention to those using the adjective white.

Image by Mariano iPhotox Luchini from Pixabay

Let’s get started with as white as a sheet meaning extremely pale because you’re sick or experiencing a very strong emotion such as fear or anger.

– You’re as white as a sheet! What’s wrong?

– I think I’ve just seen a ghost!

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Colour idioms: Blue

This is part 3 of the series of posts on idiomatic expressions using colours. Previously, we had a look at some red and green idioms. Today we’ll be looking at the most common expressions using the word blue.

Image by Monionline from Pixabay

Let’s start with feel blue. Chances are you’re already familiar with this one as it’s used a lot. Blue in this informal expression means depressed, or sad and hopeless.

She’s been feeling blue ever since her boyfriend dumped her.

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Colour idioms: green

This is part 2 of the series of blog posts about colour idioms. Last time, we had a look at some red idioms, and today we’ll explore those that mention the colour green.

Image by Public Domain Pictures from Pixabay

Let’s start with have green fingers. This idiomatic expression has nothing to do with Shrek and everything to do with one of the favourite pastimes of British people – gardening. When someone says that you have green fingers, they mean you’re very good at gardening – everything you plant grows and thrives and whether you have a proper garden or just a few planters (a container for growing plants in) outside your window they look healthy and attractive.

My gran had green fingers. Her vegetable garden was her pride and joy and the envy of the neighbours.

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