Exciting Adventures in the English Language and Culture

Month: June 2021

Beautiful English Words: Part 4

Image by Santiago Matamoros from Pixabay

Here’s another word to enrich your vocabulary and impress your listeners or readers – cantankerous /kænˈtæŋkərəs/.

A cantankerous person is annoyed and tends to argue and complain a lot.

Abandoned by his family and suffering from chronic pain in his joints, the old man became depressed and cantankerous.

I’m not entirely sure what I like about this word. Probably, the pulsating sound of it. As well as its literary feel – you don’t often hear cantankerous in conversation, which is a great shame I think.

But now you can change this! 🙂

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Conscience Vs Consciousness

The words conscience and consciousness can cause a good deal of confusion, due in some measure to the similarities in their spelling and pronunciation, so let’s have a proper look at them.

Image by Fathromi Ramdlon from Pixabay

Conscience /ˈkɒnʃəns/ can mean one of the two things:

the part of your mind that tells you whether what you are doing is morally right or wrong; i.e. we can call it our inner moral compass.

I knew I’d done nothing wrong and so I told him the truth with a clear conscience.

If you’ve done something you shouldn’t and know it, you probably have a guilty or troubled conscience.

Steve’s guilty/troubled conscience made him tell Anna he’d been cheating on her.

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